Key Stage 5 Science

BTEC Applied Science

Applied Science gives a first-hand introduction to a range of applications of scientific techniques and understanding that can be used in a wide range or careers, and further training and education. Laboratory skills developed here can be put to use in many different settings, both locally, nationally and internationally, and the practical nature of this course will give you the chance to hone your skills using scientific equipment and techniques, as well as developing entirely new ones. The importance of precision and accuracy is emphasised throughout, along with the need for clear and effective communication of scientific ideas and findings. Learning takes place across the disciplines of physics, chemistry, and biology. As the world becomes an increasingly technological and scientific place, being able to apply scientific ideas and concepts to problem solving in real world situations will really put you ahead of the game.

Course requirements:

  • Grade 5-5 in GCSE Combined Science or at least two grade 5’s from GCSE Separate Science
  • Grade 5 in GCSE Mathematics
  • Grade 5 in GCSE English language

Your key learning topics:

In the first year you will study the following topics:

Principles and applications of science – Learners will develop an understanding of key concepts relating to biology, chemistry and physics. Practical work is used to reinforce knowledge and develop learners’ practical skills.

Practical scientific procedures and techniques – Learners are introduced to new experimental techniques, reinforcing methods met previously and developing practical skills including accuracy and precision. Learners will research the background to a number of analytical and experimental techniques in an applied or vocational context.

In your second year you will study the following topics:

Science investigation skills – Learners will analyse and evaluate scientific information to develop critical thinking skills and understand the use of the media to communicate scientific ideas and theories. Learners will also find out about scientific careers through the different roles scientists undertake in scientific organisations

Plus 1 additional unit

Assessment:

As a BTEC, part of the course is assessed through the completion of coursework units, in which students will research and carry out practical investigations, before producing a written report. This is assessed internally (subject to external moderation), and forms 50% of the award.

The remaining 50% of the award is assessed by external examination. In Year 12, there is an exam for the Principles and applications of science unit, which focuses on learning from chemistry, biology and physics topics.

In Year 13, the Science investigation skills unit features an investigation carried out in class, and then a subsequent examination is taken based around the investigation and other related learning.

What can I expect on the course?

  • 10 hrs contact time every fortnight
  • Interesting and informative lessons using a wide variety of teaching techniques from friendly, experienced and successful teachers
  • A key focus on practical skills, application of knowledge, set in a work-related context.
  • The practice and application of laboratory skills which can be used in in future employment.
  • A great success rate for students at A level biology

What other courses can I combine BTEC Applied Science with?

We have had students take a wide variety of A level courses in conjunction with BTEC Applied science including:

  • Art and Photography
  • Biology
  • Chemistry
  • English
  • Humanities
  • Mathematics
  • Modern foreign languages
  • Physical education
  • Physics
  • Psychology

Therefore, if you are interested in studying applied science it can really complement many other areas of study, helping to develop your scientific understanding of the world.

Where will success take me?

Past students who have completed BTEC applied science have gone on to university study and industry work in the following areas:

  • Food science and technology industry
  • Forensic science
  • Land management and surveying
  • Paramedic science
  • Midwifery
  • Nursing
  • Pharmacology
  • Physiotherapy
  • Radiography
  • Teaching and education

A Level Biology

Biology involves the study of a wide range of exciting topics, ranging from molecular biology to the study of ecosystems, and from mammoths to microorganisms. Biology is also a contemporary subject that is never far from the headlines. The human genome has been now been sequenced and we know the complete arrangement of the three thousand million bases that make up human DNA. In Kenya 350 people die every day from AIDS and in South East Asia the skies are dark with smoke as the last Bornean rainforests are burned to grow oil palms. Biologists are concerned with all these issues. They work in the fields of cell biology, medicine, food production and ecology…and the work they do is vital to us all.

Course requirements:

  • Grade 6-6 in GCSE Combined Science or at least two grade 6’s from GCSE Separate Science
  • Grade 6 in GCSE Mathematics
  • Grade 5 in GCSE English language

Your key learning topics:

In the first year you will study the following four topics:

  • Biological molecules
  • Cells
  • How organisms exchange substances with their environment
  • Genetic information, variation, and relationships between organisms

This will give you a firm foundation helping you to develop and deepen your knowledge from GCSE and includes topics such as immunity, gas exchange, biodiversity, and DNA structure.

In your second year you will study the following topics:

  • Energy transfers in and between organisms
  • Organisms respond to changes in their internal and external environment
  • Genetics, populations, evolutions and ecosystems
  • The control of gene expression

These will extend your knowledge and skills to prepare you for your next steps into industry or further study.

Required practicals:

The A level course requires you to complete a minimum of 12 required practicals (although we offer numerous other practical opportunities throughout the course). A student that successfully completes the practicals and demonstrates the required level of competence in the skills will be awarded a Practical Endorsement – Pass as part of their A level biology certificate. 6 of the practicals are completed in Year 12 and 6 in Year 13. The practical endorsement is only awarded to those who qualify and to students who study the full A level.

These practicals are as follows:

http://filestore.aqa.org.uk/resources/biology/AQA-7401-7402-PRACTICAL-ENDORSEMENT.PDF

The aim of these practicals are to develop:

  • Practical lab skills
  • Ability to follow a method and written procedures
  • Ability to risk assess and carry out practical work safely
  • Ability to research and develop their own ideas and methods, linking in their background knowledge in a practical context

They are designed to help prepare students for both industry and/or further study at university level.

On your marks:

Below is a section from the AQA A level biology specification, showing how the course is assessed. All students will sit the AS papers at the end of Year 12, to give them a good indication of how they are progressing on the course, as well as providing firm data for future university or job offers post Year 13. Students who wish to sit the full A level and move into Year 13 must achieve a suitable grade to continue on the course.

AS Level

AQA Specification: http://filestore.aqa.org.uk/resources/biology/specifications/AQA-7401-7402-SP-2015.PDF

What can I expect on the course?

  • 10 hrs contact time every fortnight
  • Interesting and informative lessons using a wide variety of teaching techniques from friendly, experienced and successful teachers
  • A key focus on practical skills, application of knowledge, exam technique and mathematics skills required to be successful
  • A great success rate for students at A level biology

What other courses can I combine A level biology with?

We have had students take a wide variety of A level courses in conjunction with A level biology including:

  • Applied science
  • Art and Photography
  • Chemistry
  • English
  • Humanities
  • Mathematics
  • Modern foreign languages
  • Physical education
  • Physics
  • Psychology

Therefore if you are interested in biology it can really complement many other areas of study, helping to develop your scientific understanding of the world.

Where will success take me?

Past students who have completed A level biology have gone on to university study and industry work in the following areas:

  • Biology
  • Food science and technology industry
  • Forensic science
  • Land management and surveying
  • Law
  • Marine biology
  • Medical studies
  • Microbiology
  • Midwifery
  • Nursing
  • Pharmacology
  • Philosophy
  • Physiotherapy
  • Psychology
  • Radiography
  • Teaching and education
  • Veterinary studies
  • Zoology

A Level Chemistry

Chemistry is the study of matter and its interactions with other matter and energy. Within chemistry you will study three main types of chemistry; organic, inorganic and physical chemistry, you’ll also apply mathematics and logic to real world problems and everyday issues. However, anyone can understand the basics of how things work…and that’s the study of chemistry. The importance of chemistry is that it explains the world around you. We are all chemists. We use chemicals every day and perform chemical reactions without thinking much about them, such as cooking a meal, striking a match or using sun cream.

Chemistry is important because everything you do is chemistry! Even your body is made of chemicals. Chemical reactions occur when you breathe, eat, or simply sit and read a book. All matter is made of chemicals, so the importance of chemistry is that it is the study of all matter and the interactions between types of matter; quite simply it is fundamental to understanding how the universe works.

Course requirements:

  • Grade 6-6 in GCSE Combined Science or at least two grade 6’s from GCSE Separate Science (including chemistry)
  • Grade 6 in GCSE Mathematics
  • Grade 5 in GCSE English language

Your key learning topics:

During your two year course you will study the following topics:

  • Physical chemistry
  • Inorganic chemistry
  • Organic chemistry

In year 1 this will give you a firm foundation helping you to develop and deepen your knowledge from GCSE and includes topics such as energetics, kinetics and organic analysis.

In your second year you will continue to study the three main topics listed above, but in much more detail, including aromatic chemistry, transition metals and chromatography.

These will extend your knowledge and skills to prepare you for your next steps into industry or further study.

Required practicals:

The A level course requires you to complete a minimum of 12 required practicals (although we offer numerous other practical opportunities throughout the course). A student that successfully completes the practicals and demonstrates the required level of competence in the skills will be awarded a Practical Endorsement – Pass as part of their A level chemistry certificate. 6 of the practicals are completed in Year 12 and 6 in Year 13. The practical endorsement is only awarded to those who qualify and to students who study the full A level.

These practicals are as follows:

Practical handbook: http://filestore.aqa.org.uk/resources/chemistry/AQA-7404-7405-PHBK.PDF

The aim of these practicals is to develop:

  • Practical lab skills
  • Ability to follow a method and written procedures
  • Ability to risk assess and carry out practical work safely
  • Ability to research and develop their own ideas and methods, linking in their background knowledge in a practical context

They are designed to help prepare students for both industry and/or further study at university level.

On your marks:

Below is a section from the AQA A level chemistry specification, showing how the course is assessed. All students will sit the AS papers at the end of Year 12, to give them a good indication of how they are progressing on the course, as well as providing firm data for future university or job offers post Year 13. Students who wish to sit the full A level and move into Year 13 must achieve a suitable grade to continue on the course.

AQA Specification: http://filestore.aqa.org.uk/resources/chemistry/specifications/AQA-7404-7405-SP-2015.PDF

What can I expect on the course?

  • 10 hrs contact time every fortnight
  • Interesting and informative lessons using a wide variety of teaching techniques from friendly, experience and successful teachers
  • A key focus on practical skills, application of knowledge, exam technique and mathematics skills required to be successful
  • A great success rate for students at A level chemistry

What other courses can I combine A level chemistry with?

We have had students take a wide variety of A level courses in conjunction with A level chemistry including:

  • Applied science
  • Art and Photography
  • Biology
  • English
  • Humanities
  • Mathematics
  • Modern foreign languages
  • Physical education
  • Physics
  • Psychology

Therefore if you are interested in chemistry it can really complement many other areas of study, helping to develop your scientific understanding of the world.

Where will success take me?

If you wanted to go into a career in any form of medicine including doctor or veterinarian then you will find A-level chemistry compulsory, however there are many subjects and careers where this is the case, as well as there being many options where an A-level chemistry qualification is desirable. Having an A-level in chemistry is a very desirable trait and is a highly respected qualification to have in academic circles.

Past students who have completed A-level chemistry have gone on to university to study and industry to work in the following areas; however the possibilities are almost endless.

  • Biochemistry
  • Chemistry
  • Food science and technology industry
  • Forensic science
  • Geochemistry
  • Geology
  • Land management and surveying
  • Law
  • Marine chemistry
  • Medical studies
  • Medicine
  • Microchemistry
  • Nursing
  • Optometry
  • Pharmacology
  • Philosophy
  • Physiotherapy
  • Psychology
  • Radiography
  • Teaching and education
  • Veterinary studies
  • Zoology

A Level Physics

The definition of physics is “the study of matter, energy and the interaction between them”. Physics is a fundamental scientific discipline and the study of physics aims to try to answer some of the most difficult and interesting questions, such as how did the universe begin and why does it behave the way it does? Observation and experimentation within the field of physics has made significant contribution to advances in technology and our theoretical understanding of the universe, and the search to discover even more about the world and universe we live in is the fundamental ambition of the study of physics.

Course requirements:

  • Grade 6-6 in GCSE Combined Science or at least two grade 6’s from GCSE Separate Science (including physics)
  • Grade 6 in GCSE Mathematics
  • Grade 5 in GCSE English language
  • We also highly recommend that you study A level mathematics in support of A level physics

Your key learning topics:

During your two year course you will study the following topics:

Year 1

  • Particles and radiation
  • Waves
  • Mechanics and materials
  • Electricity

This will give you a firm foundation helping you to develop and deepen your knowledge from GCSE and includes topics such as quarks, Newton’s law of motion and projectiles.

Year 2

  • Fields
  • Nuclear physics
  • Further mechanics and thermal physics

In your second year you will study the topics listed above and these will extend your knowledge and skills to prepare you for your next steps into industry or further study.

Required practicals:

The A level course requires you to complete a minimum of 12 required practicals (although we offer numerous other practical opportunities throughout the course). A student that successfully completes the practicals and demonstrates the required level of competence in the skills will be awarded a Practical Endorsement – Pass as part of their A level physics certificate. 6 of the practicals are completed in Year 12 and 6 in Year 13. The practical endorsement is only awarded to those who qualify and to students who study the full A level.

These practicals are as follows:

Practical handbook: http://filestore.aqa.org.uk/resources/physics/AQA-7407-7408-PHBK.PDF

The aim of these practicals is to develop:

  • Practical lab skills
  • Ability to follow a method and written procedures
  • Ability to risk assess and carry out practical work safely
  • Ability to research and develop their own ideas and methods, linking in their background knowledge in a practical context

They are designed to help prepare students for both industry and/or further study at university level.

On your marks:

Below is a section from the AQA A level physics specification, showing how the course is assessed. All students will sit the AS papers at the end of Year 12, to give them a good indication of how they are progressing on the course, as well as providing firm data for future university or job offers post Year 13. Students who wish to sit the full A level and move into Year 13 must achieve a suitable grade to continue on the course.

AQA Specification: http://filestore.aqa.org.uk/resources/physics/specifications/AQA-7407-7408-SP-2015.PDF

What can I expect on the course?

  • 10 hrs contact time every fortnight
  • Interesting and informative lessons using a wide variety of teaching techniques from friendly, experience and successful teachers
  • A key focus on practical skills, application of knowledge, exam technique and mathematics skills required to be successful
  • A great success rate for students at A level physics

What other courses can I combine A level physics with?

We have had students take a wide variety of A level courses in conjunction with A level physics including:

  • Biology
  • English
  • Humanities
  • Mathematics
  • Further mathematics
  • Modern foreign languages
  • Music
  • Physics
  • Psychology

Therefore if you are interested in physics it can really complement many other areas of study, helping to develop your scientific understanding of the world.

Where will success take me?

Past students who have completed A-level physics have gone on to university to study and industry to work in the following areas; however the possibilities are almost endless.

  • Astrophysics
  • Engineering (mechanical and electrical)
  • Law
  • Marine physics
  • Mathematics
  • Medical studies
  • Natural sciences
  • Physics
  • Radiography
  • Teaching and education
Psychology is the scientific study of behaviour. Psychology involves the scientific study of people: how they think, how they act, react and interact. Psychology is concerned with all aspects of human behaviour and the thoughts, feelings, and motivation underlying such behaviour. Psychology is a popular university subject, can lead to a variety of careers and has significant real life application.

Entry Requirements

Students need to have achieved grade 6 in GCSE in English, maths and science to cope with the academic rigour of the course. Students with grade 5 may be accepted depending on their attainment 8 score.

Course Details
We Study AQA  – A level Psychology (7182) and AS level Psychology (7181).  The full specification can be found at http://www.aqa.org.uk/subjects/psychology/as-and-a-level/psychology-7181-7182 . The course covers theories and approaches in Psychology, the scientific process of explaining human behaviour and research methods used in Psychological investigations.
Unit 1 Introductory topics in Psychology
Social Influence – Why do people conform and obey or not? – Asch, Zimbardo and Milgram
Memory – How does it work? Why do we forget? How accurate is eye witness testimony?
Attachment – How do the attachments you form as a child influence your adult relationships?
Psychopathology – Abnormal behaviour; definitions, explanations and treatments.

Unit 2 Psychology in context
Approaches  – Do you prefer the behaviourist, social learning, cognitive, biological, psychodynamic or humanistic approach to explaining why humans behave the way that they do ?
Biopsychology – How does the nervous system, the endocrine system and the brain affect behaviour?
Research methods – How do psychologists use scientific methods to investigate human behaviour?

 

Unit 3 Issues and options in psychology
Issues and Debates in psychology – What influences your behaviour more; nature, nurture, gender, culture?
Relationships – What determines your behaviour in relationships? Real, virtual and parasocial relationships.
Schizophrenia – How can schizophrenia be diagnosed accurately and treated effectively?
Aggression – What causes human aggression; our genes or our environment?

Equipment required
Electronic textbooks are available for all students so internet access at home is useful or you may wish to purchase a hard copy of the text books. You may also wish to purchase revision text books. Please contact staff for details of publications relevant to the current A level specification.

Any other relevant information
Psychology links well with biology, applied science, geography, history and English language and English literature. The course covers contemporary topics and approaches in psychology, the scientific process of explaining human behaviour, research methods used in psychological investigations and explores current issues and debates within psychology. Unit 1 and most of Unit 2 is studied in Year 12. The rest of Unit 2 and Unit 3 are studied in Year 13. There are 2 exams at the end of Year 12 for the AS qualification and 3 exams at the end of Year 13 for the A level qualification – the A level exams cover everything taught over 2 years in Unit 1, 2 and 3.

A level psychology – programme of study

 

Year 12 AS/A level Year 1 AQA SOL reference

AQA-7181-SOW

AQA SOL reference

AQA-7181-SOW

Autumn term

 

Approaches – 5 AS topics

Psychopathology – 8 topics

week 1,19,20,21

week 22-28

Social influence – 9 topics

Research methods AS (1/5 hrs)

week 3,4,5,6

week 2,15

Spring term

 

Biopsychology – 4 AS topics

Attachment – 10 topics

week 17-19

week 11-14

Memory – 9 topics

Research methods AS (1/5 hrs)

week 7,8,9,10

week 15, 16

Summer term

 

 

After AS exam

Revision

AS Exam

 

Approaches – 3 A level topics

week 29

week 30

 

AQA – 7182 -SOW

Week -1,2,5

Revision

AS Exam

 

Research methods AS overview

week 29

week 30

 

 

 

Year 13 A level Year 2 AQA SOL reference

 

Autumn term Biopsychology – 7 A level topics

Issues and Debates – 7 topics

Schizophrenia – 9 topics

AQA – 7182 -SOW – week 6,7

AQA – 7182 -SOW – week 3,4

AQA-71823C2A-SOW (6 weeks)

Research methods A level
Spring term Aggression – 10 topics

 

Relationships – 10 topics

AQA-71823D3A-SOW (6 weeks)

 

AQA-71823B1A-SOW (6 weeks)

Research methods A level
Summer term Revision

Exam skills

 

A level exam

Revision

Exam skills

 

A level exam

 

.